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MLDW Programme & Abstracts

10 May

Music Linked Data Workshop, JISC, London, 12 May 2011

Programme

10:30 – Welcome

Morning Session: Research Papers
Chaired by Richard Polfreman (Music, University of Southampton)

10:35 – MusicNet: Aligning Musicology’s Metadata
David Bretherton, Daniel Alexander Smith, Joe Lambert and mc schraefel (Music, and Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton)

11:05 – Towards Web-Scale Analysis of Musical Structure
J. Stephen Downie (Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), David De Roure (Oxford e-Research Centre, University of Oxford) and Kevin Page (Oxford e-Research Centre, University of Oxford)

11:35 – LinkedBrainz Live
Simon Dixon, Cedric Mesnage and Barry Norton (Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London)

12:05 – BBC Music – Using the Web as our Content Management System
Nicholas Humfrey (BBC)

12:35 – Lunch

Afternoon Session: Funding & Project Presentations
Chaired by David Bretherton (Music, University of Southampton)

13:30 – JISC Funding Roadmap for 2011-12
David Flanders (JISC)

13:45 – Early Music Online: Opening up the British Library’s 16th-Century Music Books
Sandra Tuppen (British Library)

14:00 – Musonto – A Semantic Search Engine Dedicated to Music and Musicians
Jean-Philippe Fauconnier (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium) and Joseph Roumier (CETIC, Belgium)

14:15 – Listening to Movies – Creating a User-Centred Catalogue of Music for Films
Charlie Inskip (freelance music consultant)

14:30 – Q & A and Discussion Session
Chaired by Geraint Wiggins (Department of Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London)

16:00 – End

Abstracts for Morning Research Papers

MusicNet: Aligning Musicology’s Metadata

David Bretherton, Daniel Alexander Smith, Joe Lambert and mc schraefel (Music, and Electronics and Computer Science, University of Southampton)

As more resources are published as Linked Data, data from multiple heterogeneous sources should be more rapidly discoverable and automatically integrable, enabling it to be reused in contexts beyond those originally envisaged. But Linked Data is not of itself a complete solution. One of the key challenges of Linked Data is that its strength is also a weakness: anyone can publish anything. So in music, for instance, 17 sources may independently publish data about ‘Schubert’, but there is no de facto way to know that any of these Schuberts are the same, because the sources are not aligned. Alignment is a prerequisite for usable Linked Data, without which resources are effectively stranded rather than integrated. To begin to address this, the MusicNet project has minted URIs for composers, and has published as RDF basic biographical data and – crucially – alignment information for several leading providers of musicological data.

Towards Web-Scale Analysis of Musical Structure

J. Stephen Downie (Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), David De Roure (Oxford e-Research Centre, University of Oxford) and Kevin Page (Oxford e-Research Centre, University of Oxford)

SALAMI (Structural Analysis of Large Amounts of Music Information) is an ambitious computational musicology project which applies a computational approach to the huge volume of digital recordings now available from such sources as the Internet Archive. It aims to deliver a very substantive corpus of musical analyses in a common framework for use by music scholars, students and beyond, and to establish a web-based methodology and tooling which will enable others to add to this in the future. In its first phase the project has conducted a significant exercise in ground truth collection with 1000 recordings analysed by music students and shortly to be published as open Linked Data.

LinkedBrainz Live

Simon Dixon, Cedric Mesnage and Barry Norton (Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London)

The MusicBrainz dataset is a large open (openly-licensed and open to contribution) collection of metadata about music, containing information on artists, their recorded works, and acoustic fingerprints. The LinkedBrainz project aims at making MusicBrainz Linked Data compliant. Linked Data principles require that the data is made available using an RDF serialisation over HTTP, and that this is interlinked with existing datasets. Linked Data Best Practice encourages an endpoint where queries can be made using the SPARQL query language for RDF. The LinkedBrainz project is rolling out an RDFa annotation of the relevant MusicBrainz pages, and is preparing a SPARQL endpoint and RDF-based dereferencing.  In this talk we will give further details on progress and future work, and will show the utility of the dataset as Linked Data by demonstrating the ease with which ‘mash-ups’ can be formed, based on interlinkage with resources such as DBPedia and BBC Music Reviews.

BBC Music – Using the Web as our Content  Management System

Nicholas Humfrey (BBC)

The BBC Music site provides a page for every artist played on the BBC. These pages use persistent web identifiers for each artist, which serve as an aggregation point for all content and information. By reusing structured data available elsewhere on the Web – the Web becomes our Content Management System. The core metadata is then enhanced with content, such as videos and reviews, from the BBC, thereby providing a compelling audience proposition and also making the BBC content re-aggregatable by other websites, thus contributing to the web as a whole.

 
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Posted by David Bretherton in Dissemination, Workshop

 

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